Jump to content

ViFF

ED Closed Beta Testers Team
  • Posts

    545
  • Joined

  • Last visited

1 Follower

About ViFF

  • Birthday 08/15/1972

Personal Information

  • Location
    Israel

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. The Israeli community was recently cleared by the IAF to publish a redacted unclassified version of the LLRD approach plates. You can download and see for yourself if there is a TACAN at Ramat David and what is its channel. PDF format: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ffa7krjztlybqx5/LLRD Approach and Departure Notes Volume 1.pdf?dl=0 PNG format: https://www.dropbox.com/s/yz2qzbuu4z50a8w/LLRD Approach and Departure Notes Volume 1.zip?dl=0 Cheers ViFF
  2. Here is a very good video interview with Philstyle and Dietrich where he has some very good insight and ideas about DCS WW2. He talks about a few things but I think the one point that hits the nail on the head is about the importance of being consistent with regards to "THEATRE COHERENCY". Cheers!
  3. Any details what F-4E block this will be? Please pray let it be Block 53 with all the goodies in weapons, avionics, less-smokey engines and the slats from the Agile Eagle Program that improved maneuverability!!! Salute!
  4. It's very likely the damage is also to the feathering mechanism. You need electricity to drive the oil pump that pushes oil into the constant speed governor mechanism that actually turns the blades into the oblique angle. That's 3 vital components that need to remain undamaged in order for the feathering to properly work. In the vast majority of cases damage in the engine area will kill your ability to feather the prop. Also notice the shaking. You definitely have damage to the prop. I wouldn't expect the feathering to work. The natural force of the blades is to go to fine pitch (max rpm). You can test if you go full throttle and max RPM if it will go over 3,000 RPM you have no more control of the prop's blades pitch - forget about feathering... Cheers!
  5. I don't think you noticed how many times the goal post moved on this one post, edited quite a few times. The original list included JSOW C which I was very happy to see because that covers the loadouts for F-16s operated by Turkey. When the decision was made that stations 4 and 6 to include weapons requiring MIL-STD 1760 I was very happy because it also covers the typical loadouts of Israeli and Hellenic F-16s (JDAM & AGM-88 respectively). Cheers!
  6. Allowing for weapons that are already in the game is a reasonable request: AGM-88, GBU-31 JDAM, JSOW C. When you already have an F-18 for country SPAIN that can be loaded up with with a LITENENING pod on the cheek station this goes a long way for the immersion of the customer. This has no impact on Marine purists that load the pod on the centerline or USN purists who load the ATFLIR instead. The same appreciation for enthusiasts looking for non USAF ANG loadouts of weapons that are already modelled in the game would be very welcoming for the customers of the F-16. Cheers!
  7. First of all, yes, he is wrong. If you see an Israeli Block 40 Viper with JDAMS on 4 & 6 and you know that the end user agreements do not allow changes... Again, as I posted in another thread, I have no problem with this limitation to that a circa 2007 ANG F-16 Block 50 is being accurately simulated. The amount of work that went into researching what is a valid loadout for the circa 2007 F-16 Block 50 Tape 7 that served in the ANG is very impressive and commendable. However, the larger part of the customer base does not care about the details such as "removal or lack of of umbilicals" or restrictions of loadouts at the squadron level. DCS claims to be a "sandbox simulation", there are loadout compromises with other ED modules such as the F-18 and A-10, and the F-16 is far more ubiquitous, serving in many Air Forces all over the world. Based on publicly available information and information from SMEs of other nations that operate F-16 about what is technically possible, when I create a mission on the Syria map and place an F-16 of: Country USAF - I expect to be able to load LAU-88 on stations 3 & 7. Country ISRAEL - I expect GBU-31 JDAM on stations 4 and 6. Country TURKEY - I expect JSOW C. Country GREECE - I expect AGM-88 on stations 4 & 6 to work. When choosing an F-16 of a different country you get a set of skins resembling what they have in their own country. The last thing they are concerned about is lack of realism. The customer knows these are additional content and not the focus of the module. It is obvious that the immersion is to have fun, and use the common loadouts they see on pictures of their nation's F-16s, but obviously within the limits of what is modelled in DCS. Not asking for Python 5 air to air missiles. Just the munitions that are already there in the game and we know can be used by these operators. That's why I think the best solution is to have in the mission editor an option to enable "Expanded Loadouts for non USAF Vipers". Cheers!
  8. Nope. Sorry. You are wrong. All block 50s that came off the production line have 1760 capable Aircraft station interfaces (ASI) on all the pylon stations: outboard, inboard and centerline. The CCIP upgrade program and integration of MN-4260 and MN-426030 programs into a single program to standardize all pylons of all Vipers Blocks 25 to 42 to was to have the same Federal Stock Number to reflect the Block 50 configuration. The umbilicals come as a separate component of the pylon. You can choose to install them or not. The ANG choose not to install them. Its that simple. This has nothing to do with "wiring on the aircraft".
  9. Agreed very frustrating. The "wiring modification" is actually an intervention by the specific operator (ANG) to dumb down what was an otherwise a fully capable aircraft delivered from the OEM, all for the sake of cutting down maintenance and replacement costs of umbilical connectors becuase these are components that have a high rate of change due to all the punishment they take from being exposed to adverse weather conditions and normal wear and tear when releasing ordinance. The Israelis for example, kept them and are carrying GBU-31 JDAMS on stations 4 and 6 on their Block 40 Vipers.
  10. Specifically on this sortie they were mounted only for reducing wing flutter. The IAF Block 40 does not have AIM-120 capability.
  11. Its for the purpose of loitering. When loitering is not expected you can use them for JDAM. Unlike the USAF ANG, the IAF do not remove the umbilicals from Stations 4 and 6. Here is a picture from the recent conflict in May 2021 of an Israeli Block 40 of the 101st Squadron with GBU-31 JDAMS on stations 4 and 6:
  12. The only way to sort out this mess between the champions of "dogma" vs "technically possible" should be left to the player to decide via mission editor options and in case of multiplayer should be server enforced. The amount of work that went into researching what is a valid loadout for the circa 2007 F-16 Block 50 Tape 7 that served in the ANG is very impressive and commendable. However, the larger part of the customer base does not care about the details such as "removal of umbilicals" or restrictions of loadouts at the squadron level. Based on publicly available information and information from SMEs of other nations that operate F-16 about what is technically possible, when I create a mission on the Syria map and place an F-16 of: Country USAF - I expect to be able to load LAU-88 on stations 3 & 7. Country ISRAEL - I expect GBU-31 JDAM on stations 4 and 6. Country TURKEY - I expect JSOW C. Country GREECE - I expect AGM-88 on stations 4 & 6. Cheers!
  13. It is very likely that in a peer scenario the GPS satellites of both sides would be taken out in the first stages of the conflict.
×
×
  • Create New...