Jump to content

elevons moving during taxi


bkthunder
 Share

Recommended Posts

For the sake of realism and authenticity, please let the FBW move the elevons up and down also during taxi (when you hit the brakes, small bumps etc.).

 

This is a feature of all FBW aircraft and is visible already in DCS Su-27, F-15 (yes I know, this one is not FBW), and in BMS F-16.

 

I remember at one point also the M2000 had this effect, then it was removed.

 

If you have a look at videos on youtube you can spot the small movements, for example in this video

 

 

Thanks

Windows 10 - Intel i7 7700K 4.2 Ghz (no OC) - Asus Strix GTX 1080 8Gb - 16GB DDR4 (3000 MHz) - SSD 500GB + WD Black FZEX 1TB 6Gb/s

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreed I'm not seeing any visible effect, not to say it isn't there but open to data/evidence. Once you hit a reasonable speed you do start to see the affect of the FBW system but at such a low speed such as taxiing the FBW control laws really are pretty negligible.

"Witness mere F-14s taking off from adjacent flight decks, gracefully canting left and right, afterburners flaming, and there’s something that sweeps you away—or at least it does me. And no amount of knowledge of the potential abuses of carrier task forces can affect the depth of that feeling. It simply speaks to another part of me. It doesn’t want recriminations or politics. It just wants to fly.”

― Carl Sagan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Fox One, that's much clearer

"Witness mere F-14s taking off from adjacent flight decks, gracefully canting left and right, afterburners flaming, and there’s something that sweeps you away—or at least it does me. And no amount of knowledge of the potential abuses of carrier task forces can affect the depth of that feeling. It simply speaks to another part of me. It doesn’t want recriminations or politics. It just wants to fly.”

― Carl Sagan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It seems to be a rare thing, compare to the F-16 which is very visible an common.


Edited by mvsgas

To whom it may concern,

I am an idiot, unfortunately for the world, I have a internet connection and a fondness for beer....apologies for that.

Thank you for you patience.

 

 

Many people don't want the truth, they want constant reassurance that whatever misconception/fallacies they believe in are true..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreed, it seems to take quite a bit of bounce to make it apparent, at a minimum I think we should be seeing the M-2000C do a bit of elevon movement when doing a hard stop with the brakes that would induce a similar pitch oscillation in the video but since all taxi ways are more or less flat, it is probably negligible when doing normal taxi.

"Witness mere F-14s taking off from adjacent flight decks, gracefully canting left and right, afterburners flaming, and there’s something that sweeps you away—or at least it does me. And no amount of knowledge of the potential abuses of carrier task forces can affect the depth of that feeling. It simply speaks to another part of me. It doesn’t want recriminations or politics. It just wants to fly.”

― Carl Sagan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

That's exactly what I meant, thanks, I struggled to find a video where it was so clear :thumbup:

 

Anyway, I remember it was implemented at some point. To me it seems like you are "stopping" control laws below a certain speed. What if you let the FBW on all the time? That would give such effect I think.

 

P.S. Agree that on the F-16 is particularly evident, but on the Mirage is definitely there too, just the elevons are smaller, so you see it less.

Windows 10 - Intel i7 7700K 4.2 Ghz (no OC) - Asus Strix GTX 1080 8Gb - 16GB DDR4 (3000 MHz) - SSD 500GB + WD Black FZEX 1TB 6Gb/s

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's exactly what I meant, thanks, I struggled to find a video where it was so clear :thumbup:

 

Anyway, I remember it was implemented at some point. To me it seems like you are "stopping" control laws below a certain speed. What if you let the FBW on all the time? That would give such effect I think.

 

P.S. Agree that on the F-16 is particularly evident, but on the Mirage is definitely there too, just the elevons are smaller, so you see it less.

 

You are absolutely right, it was there before, however at some point I reduced the stabilization gain to such a degree that it was very small to none at taxing speeds. I more or less went back to the original way and doing heavy breaking the effect is pretty much as seen in the video now :)

"Witness mere F-14s taking off from adjacent flight decks, gracefully canting left and right, afterburners flaming, and there’s something that sweeps you away—or at least it does me. And no amount of knowledge of the potential abuses of carrier task forces can affect the depth of that feeling. It simply speaks to another part of me. It doesn’t want recriminations or politics. It just wants to fly.”

― Carl Sagan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are absolutely right, it was there before, however at some point I reduced the stabilization gain to such a degree that it was very small to none at taxing speeds. I more or less went back to the original way and doing heavy breaking the effect is pretty much as seen in the video now :)

 

Haha! cool :holiday::punk:

Windows 10 - Intel i7 7700K 4.2 Ghz (no OC) - Asus Strix GTX 1080 8Gb - 16GB DDR4 (3000 MHz) - SSD 500GB + WD Black FZEX 1TB 6Gb/s

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What if you let the FBW on all the time?

The flight computer or the FBW system is always on with electrical power. So if the generators and the battery are working, so is the FLCS/FLCC.

To whom it may concern,

I am an idiot, unfortunately for the world, I have a internet connection and a fondness for beer....apologies for that.

Thank you for you patience.

 

 

Many people don't want the truth, they want constant reassurance that whatever misconception/fallacies they believe in are true..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The flight computer or the FBW system is always on with electrical power. So if the generators and the battery are working, so is the FLCS/FLCC.

 

He was referencing a possible speed limit the devs imposed on the FBW.

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

GCI: "Control to SEAD: Enemy SAM site 190 for 30, cleared to engage"

Striker: "Copy, say Altitude?"

GCI: "....Deck....it´s a SAM site..."

Striker: "Oh...."

Fighter: "Yeah, those pesky russian build, baloon based SAMs."

 

-Red-Lyfe

 

Best way to troll DCS community, make an F-16A, see how dedicated the fans really are :thumbup:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He was referencing a possible speed limit the devs imposed on the FBW.

Got that, and I was saying the FLCS should always be on. So, what are you saying?

To whom it may concern,

I am an idiot, unfortunately for the world, I have a internet connection and a fondness for beer....apologies for that.

Thank you for you patience.

 

 

Many people don't want the truth, they want constant reassurance that whatever misconception/fallacies they believe in are true..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Er, the F-15C is most certainly using a variant of FBW called Control Augmentation System.

 

Its not a variant... its just an analouge dampning crontrol device

Intel Core i7-6700K Cpu 4.00 GHz OC 4.8 GHz Water Cooled|32 GB DDR4 ram OC| Nvidia RTX 2080Ti| TrustMaster Warthog|Saitek Battle Pro Pedals | Logitec G13| Oculus Rift S :joystick:

 

I´m in for a ride, a VR ride:pilotfly:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBX_-Hml7_7s1dggit_vGpA?view_as=public

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The F-15 CAS and hydromechanical systems work together to provide more or less the same thing a FBW system would, so while yes, calling it FBW is wrong, to say that it has nothing to do with FBW and is a simple damper system is equally wrong.

 

The inputs through the stick force sensors are sent directly to the rudder and stabilator actuators after passing through the Pitch and Roll/Yaw computers. Even if every single mechanical linkage breaks or the stick is welded rigid the plane will be controllable, with degraded performance obviously.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...