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Under normal conditions I don't have any problems taking off with MI-8 but in a mission I made that is set in winter with snowstorm I cant seem to get more than 10 feet off the ground without suffering a generator failure.

Trying MI-8 out in Nevada (Groom Lake-High Altitude) I'm having exact same problem.

Having flown Huey for a while I know these conditions are tougher but I cant even get airborn. Any tips or advice on what I might be doing wrong ?

 

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Under normal conditions I don't have any problems taking off with MI-8 but in a mission I made that is set in winter with snowstorm I cant seem to get more than 10 feet off the ground without suffering a generator failure.

Trying MI-8 out in Nevada (Groom Lake-High Altitude) I'm having exact same problem.

Having flown Huey for a while I know these conditions are tougher but I cant even get airborn. Any tips or advice on what I might be doing wrong ?

 

The manual states that with the anti-ice/air particle separator operating your takeoff weights need to be reduced. I assume you are not using these systems during warmer weather. Also the PSS has a negative effect on fuel consumption as well. Check out section 7.4.7 of Belsemtec's English Mi-8 manual. It has hyperlinks to the required charts. The PSS saps quite a bit of power from the engines when in operation.

 

https://www.digitalcombatsimulator.com/en/downloads/documentation/magnificent_eight_flight_manual/

 

* You are letting your engine RPM get to low to sustain your generator operation.


Edited by Vampyre

Truly superior pilots are those that use their superior judgment to avoid those situations where they might have to use their superior skills.

 

If you ever find yourself in a fair fight, your tactics suck!

 

"If at first you don't succeed, Carrier Landings are not for you!"

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*Rotor RPM

 

Thank you for the correction.

 

How and where is the SGS-40PU connected to the rotor system? My assumption was that it was an engine driven generator powered through an accessory gearbox.


Edited by Vampyre
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Truly superior pilots are those that use their superior judgment to avoid those situations where they might have to use their superior skills.

 

If you ever find yourself in a fair fight, your tactics suck!

 

"If at first you don't succeed, Carrier Landings are not for you!"

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There is no accessory gearbox (well, there is on the engines, but that's not where the generators are). The generators are mounted on and driven by the main gearbox.

 

EDIT: The older TV2-117 engines on earlier Mi-8 helicopters had a DC starter/generator mounted on the engine gearbox, and a single AC generator mounted on the main gearbox. When they switched to the TV3-117, the engines lost the starter generators and gained air turbine starters, and a second AC generator was mounted to the main gearbox.


Edited by AlphaOneSix
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There is no accessory gearbox (well, there is on the engines, but that's not where the generators are). The generators are mounted on and driven by the main gearbox.

 

EDIT: The older TV2-117 engines on earlier Mi-8 helicopters had a DC starter/generator mounted on the engine gearbox, and a single AC generator mounted on the main gearbox. When they switched to the TV3-117, the engines lost the starter generators and gained air turbine starters, and a second AC generator was mounted to the main gearbox.

 

Thanks. That explains a lot. My experience lies with jets and the generators are usually either directly attached to the engine through the accessory gearbox or are attached to a airframe mounted accessory drive that has a torque shaft that connects to the engine accessory gearbox. I find it interesting that both generators are attached to the main gearbox for the rotor. Usually, the purpose of having two separate systems is to lessen the likelihood of complete system failure but I suppose if the main gearbox fails then you are pretty much screwed anyway.

Truly superior pilots are those that use their superior judgment to avoid those situations where they might have to use their superior skills.

 

If you ever find yourself in a fair fight, your tactics suck!

 

"If at first you don't succeed, Carrier Landings are not for you!"

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That's true. No main gearbox and a helicopter becomes an expensive rock. But anyway this is usually done so that everything keeps running even if you lose both engines. Think of the main rotor as a big RAT (that's a jet thing, right?). :D

 

Makes sense. Actually, a single giant turbine engine might be more accurate... Ram air doesn't normally play a factor with a rotor unless something has gone horribly wrong. :thumbup:

Truly superior pilots are those that use their superior judgment to avoid those situations where they might have to use their superior skills.

 

If you ever find yourself in a fair fight, your tactics suck!

 

"If at first you don't succeed, Carrier Landings are not for you!"

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