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E-2 snaps cable! Mega save by Pilot! :)


OnlyforDCS
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https://videosift.com/video/Arresting-Cable-Snaps-During-E-2-Landing-USS-Eisenhower

 

Check it out! I hope someone bought that pilot a crate of beer! :thumbup:

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...and nothing for the flight deck crew first responders for the eight sailors with various broken bones and a possible TBI from the snapback? They are the actual heroes from that day.

Truly superior pilots are those that use their superior judgment to avoid those situations where they might have to use their superior skills.

 

If you ever find yourself in a fair fight, your tactics suck!

 

"If at first you don't succeed, Carrier Landings are not for you!"

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The Crew was airlifted to Sentara Leigh Norfolk, I was here w/ my black security shirt, pushing back the idiot news reporters live broadcasting on facebook the arrival of injured sailers.

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...and nothing for the flight deck crew first responders for the eight sailors with various broken bones and a possible TBI from the snapback? They are the actual heroes from that day.

 

Ouch, kind of harsh! I don't see how you could construe from my post that I meant any disrespect for the deck crew and the first responders. In any case let me state my condolances and respect for the brave deck crew who do this dangerous work, day in day out.

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I think the Engines Saved the Plane..

 

Indeed. I realize that Navy pilots train for this kind of thing, still there is a difference between training and actually being in this kind of situation. So many additional things could have gone wrong, but the pilot kept his cool and saved the plane.

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The old engines and Props wouldnt have saved that plane.

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The training saved the plane and possible some of their lifes, as the ground crew day.

Possible the caller got in time too to call full throttle.

 

It just isn't a pilot in those cases.

 

That reminds me as well from one episode in "JAG" where same situation was as episode based true events. It was nice to see how the ground crew operated and what happened below deck on those cables. So you really got a grasp what the deck crew life was about in landings. Propaganda at its best.

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In that instant in time when the cable snaps it is the pilot and ONLY the pilot that saves the day ! Only he pushes the power up then with consummate skill milks the wing to get everything out of it as the aeroplane in that unnerving settling comes off the deck..... He is in that moment of time on his own doing his thing that he has trained for countless times.

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Speaking of the engines, I really like the design of the E-2 powerplants.

 

The gas generator is connected directly to the prop, so there's no "spooling" so to speak. When you firewall the throttle, the engine just gets more fuel flow and the props increase in pitch to maintain RPM. This means that throttle response is practically instant.


Edited by Pocket Sized

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In order to utilize a system to your advantage, you must know how it works.

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the procedure to apply full power when catching the arrestor hook in case the wire snaps? It might have been one of the reasons it recovered from the accident.

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

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Absolutely, the throttles should already be fully advanced by the time the cable gives way. The pilot did well to not overreact and stall the aircraft, but at the end of the day he just followed proper procedure and they had a tiny bit of luck on hand to counteract the enormously bad luck they had with their trap.

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Throttles were at full when the cable snapped, every naval aircraft is trained to be full throttle on touch down for that reason, however, in this case, the cable snapped literally as the aircraft was nearly stopped, the aircraft's limited forward momentum + carrier speed + wind + NP2000 Blade system are the only reason that aircraft was able to accelerate away.

 

and very much in part to the pilot keeping the pitch at a minimum until he had the airspeed to pitch up.

 

Like I said, had the E-2 been running the older engines and the older blades, they wouldnt have been able to save it. The NP2000 System is just that much better.


Edited by SkateZilla

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Nope, Pocket is very much correct.

 

I'm surprised by the amount of stick input the pilot is applying during that landing, Is that normal with big planes like that? Or is that normal of Carrier landings in general? Quite Interesting, I've only ever played with Small stuff in our sims.

Come fly with me, lets fly, lets fly away! -Sinatra

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I'm surprised by the amount of stick input the pilot is applying during that landing, Is that normal with big planes like that? Or is that normal of Carrier landings in general? Quite Interesting, I've only ever played with Small stuff in our sims.

 

From what I've seen, it's pretty common among carrier landings. They have to maintain a very specific glideslope and airspeed so they stay "on top" of the aircraft so to speak.

 

Also, yes, I heard from an E-2 pilot discussing this very video that they go to beta pitch upon touchdown.

DCS modules are built up to a spec, not down to a schedule.

 

In order to utilize a system to your advantage, you must know how it works.

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I was more worried about the deck crew when I saw that cable snapping.

 

Are there any safety measures to ensure the crew doesn't get hit by a cable flying around?

 

paying attention.

 

most of the crew was able to jump over the cable as it went across the deck,

 

one sailor was caught from behind in one of the alternate camera angles, that sailor was likely one of the more severe injuries.

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