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Picture-in-Picture


milesk
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I am trying to learn to land the UH-1H, but cannot quite co-ordinate the last 50 feet. A Picture-in-Picture (PIP) would be extremely helpful, where I can fly internally, and see how my craft responds externally. any suggestions?

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A PIP may be helpful, but I'm not sure how you'd go about accomplishing this.

 

TBH you don't need it. If you keep practicing you'll get it down quickly.

 

Set aside a bit of time every day for a week to do landing practicing. Go up to 500 ft radar altitude, pick a spot in the distance (give yourself plenty of room for an approach while you're learning), and make a landing.

 

Do this 10-20 times a day. It took me around 100 landings in the huey before it clicked.

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Landing (and taking off, and hovering) a helicopter is all about the hover reference.

You need to pick a good reference to hover off in order to land at the correct attitude.

 

Some instructors teach you to choose a specific object to hover off but this may only give good reference for azimuth/heading and not the whole picture.

Good instructors will teach you to reference multiple objects or a "picture".

Try to line up two objects so that you have their relative distance/location to notice drift and attitude.

Try not to have your reference directly in front of you, use something slightly off the nose more in the 1230-1'o clock as it will help picking up on the tail drift better.

Try not to pick something too close or look at the ground, your stick will tend to follow your eyes which means you will naturally pitch forward if you are looking through the lower quarter window.

If you are landing in a circuit pattern (which you should be every time), once you hit your final approach point (wings level after your base turn) then pick a distant aim-point (e.g end of runway). Try to keep this spot in the same part of your windscreen such as lining it up with a piece of dirt or a rivet on the windscreen pillar. By maintaining this aim-point you will naturally have a good approach to a 10ft hover.

There is no reason you should be stopping at 50ft under the helicopter to land unless you are entering a confined area, try to always be at 100m to run with 100ft under and descend and move forward until you are at 10m to run and 10ft under. This way you can slowly inch forward until you are over your termination and landing will be much quicker.

 

If it was real (or if multi-crew was implemented) you could have a crewman calling you onto your spot and helping with you positioning in this case but I don't think PIP will help you with this one. Practice simple, at an airfield doing circuits to a 10ft hover. Its tedious but will help you immensely when you move on because technically, every approach is an airfield circuit with different scenery!

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Milesk; Don't know if you watched this video. It is by XtraSensory and well done. He takes you through a traffic pattern circuit, from take off to landing telling you what he is doing with the controls. And has several how to videos with the Uh-1, packs the right info into a short video.

 

 

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