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Does anywhere sell pre-wired switches?


obious
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Hi All,

 

Does anyone know if its possible to buy toggles switches that come pre-wired? Or maybe even a service that lets you send off your switches (inc. wire maybe) that then does all the soldering etc?

 

I'm building full left and right console panels for the F-18C and the thought of spending multiple days cutting wire, soldering, heat crimping etc for all the switches is getting me down :)

 

Thanks

Intel 12900k @ 5.2Ghz, RTX 4090, Samsung 1TB NVME, Thrustmaster Warthog & F-18 stick, Pendular Rudder Pedals - HP Reverb

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I know what you mean - the actual wiring up of all that I have made has been an incredibly trying part, and probably my least favourite part of the build. However I have tried, where I can, to make PCB's that the switches solder directly to, and that has really helped as the PCB's also have headers so I can use multiple connection headers to take the signal to the bodnar board or Arduino.

 

But to answer your original question, I have only seen pre-wired potentiometers, never switches

 

Cheers

 

Les

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Interesting, I’ve always wanted to go down the route of making my own PCBs but have found it difficult to get stated; I also use Bodnar boards and would like an easier/neater way of connecting 32 or 64 inputs

 

What software do you use to create the PCBs and where do you get them fab’d?

Intel 12900k @ 5.2Ghz, RTX 4090, Samsung 1TB NVME, Thrustmaster Warthog & F-18 stick, Pendular Rudder Pedals - HP Reverb

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I use Qcad to design them ( there is a free to use version, the 'trial' version ) and then engrave them myself using a 3018 cnc engraver. The attached picture is one I made yesterday for the TISL OLED multiplexer

 

Middlefart uses ExpressPCB and has them made for him, but as I am constantly changing my designs I like the ability to do it myself

 

Cheers

 

Les

20200529_091532.thumb.jpg.ce2b845b9c23ef9916d9c5a3b8884607.jpg

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I think there were a couple of people wanting this info, so here's what I do for PCB's.

 

I use 30 degree engraving cutters, and go to 0.1 mm deep on each pass until the complete PCB is engraved. Max speed you can get on the cutter spindle, and about 300 mm per minute feed speed for the x and y axes movement.

 

I also clamped a piece of thick MDF on the router bed that has holes drilled in it at 30mm spacing in a matrix, with those knurled M3 'nuts' (like these https://www.ebay.com/itm/100pcs-M3-6mm-Brass-Cylinder-Knurled-Threaded-Round-Insert-Embedded-Nuts-kit/333583802504?hash=item4dab24e088:g:JdYAAOSwuSxepAlx ) at the bottom, and then machined the top of the MDF so it was flat, so that I could put the blank PCB on it and know that it was reasonably level.

 

The most important thing is to make sure that the PCB is held down firmly and evenly, don't overtighten any screws as this pulls the PCB down locally and you won't get it to engrave in that area.

 

To machine contact holes, slots for switch contacts, screw holes and clearance pockets I use 0.8mm end mill cutters, again max speed, 0.3mm depth cuts each pass at MAXIMUM 200 mm per minute feed. This also works for the outer profile of the boards, but be careful near the end to prevent the PCB coming loose and fouling the cutter.

 

I was thinking of trying o get some of the reusable silicone double sided tape to put between the PCB and the bed to see if that helped keep the blank PCB firm without having to tighten it too much. However in the absence of that use as many clamps as you can, as this will improve your chances of a good job, at least in my experience

 

Cheers

 

Les

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I think there were a couple of people wanting this info, so here's what I do for PCB's.

 

I use 30 degree engraving cutters, and go to 0.1 mm deep on each pass until the complete PCB is engraved. Max speed you can get on the cutter spindle, and about 300 mm per minute feed speed for the x and y axes movement.

 

I also clamped a piece of thick MDF on the router bed that has holes drilled in it at 30mm spacing in a matrix, with those knurled M3 'nuts' (like these https://www.ebay.com/itm/100pcs-M3-6mm-Brass-Cylinder-Knurled-Threaded-Round-Insert-Embedded-Nuts-kit/333583802504?hash=item4dab24e088:g:JdYAAOSwuSxepAlx ) at the bottom, and then machined the top of the MDF so it was flat, so that I could put the blank PCB on it and know that it was reasonably level.

 

The most important thing is to make sure that the PCB is held down firmly and evenly, don't overtighten any screws as this pulls the PCB down locally and you won't get it to engrave in that area.

 

To machine contact holes, slots for switch contacts, screw holes and clearance pockets I use 0.8mm end mill cutters, again max speed, 0.3mm depth cuts each pass at MAXIMUM 200 mm per minute feed. This also works for the outer profile of the boards, but be careful near the end to prevent the PCB coming loose and fouling the cutter.

 

I was thinking of trying o get some of the reusable silicone double sided tape to put between the PCB and the bed to see if that helped keep the blank PCB firm without having to tighten it too much. However in the absence of that use as many clamps as you can, as this will improve your chances of a good job, at least in my experience

 

Cheers

 

Les

 

 

I use miter glue if that's at all helpful.

 

 

 

Put layers of painter's tape on your base, lay the work piece upside down over that and put painter's tape on it so they line up.

 

 

Put a line of the CYA part of the miter glue on the base layer, spray the activator on the work piece, then carefully lay the work piece in place. Won't move until you wedge it up.

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Custom cable harness suppliers are most likely to provide such services. To them your precious switches are just another component they can attach to the ends of those cables. Not much of a standardized solution, but should be the closest to what you're looking for.

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