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LWR question


wolf_288
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I never saw a laser warning receiver which can give you the exact range to the threat. This info is only available for the sender of the laser beam using the time the beam need to reach the target (you) and the way back.

 

If the heading would be a little bit more exact, that would be nice ;)

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how does it work today????

 

In the case of the Ka-50, it works as in the simulator, today.

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There are six or so little sensors on the Ka-50. The most visible of which is on the very back, it is a small square plate. When these little plates detect laser energy, such as the type that is used to get a range or to guide a missile, it sends a signal to the LWR that says "holy shit, laser energy detected." The LWR takes that signal and, if it came from the rearward sensor, it will light up the bottom light, indicating that it came from behind you.

 

There isn't anything that it can do but sense. It knows if there is laser energy or not. It probably also can judge the strength of the laser energy too. The sensor can't tell where the energy is coming from, it just knows if there is contact with the laser or not. In theory, a helicopter could be just barely behind you and off two miles away on your right, lase you, and if the laser only hits the rearward sensor, the LWR will think the source is just behind you because there isn't contact with the right-side sensor.

 

A super-sophisticated sensor might be able to detect the precise wavelength of the laser, and then compare that to a database of known laser wavelengths and judge what kind of vehicle is lasing it, but that is not a capability of the Ka-50. I can imagine that if a new helicopter was designed today with an infinite budget, it would have that kind of sensor.

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