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In the release notes for 1.11 E.D. says they re-introduced 800x600 display for people who use 3D glasses.

Does anybody actualy use them & if so - what are they like ? Obviously you like them otherwise you wouldn't use them ,but how good is the 3D, does it help with SA? etc....

Cheers.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I wonder too.

 

How well does the hud display in 3d stereo?

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First of all, you get to experience true 3d. Not the fake 3d on a monitor, but stereoscopy. Depth perception.

 

Now there are two kinds of 3dglasses. There's the shutterglasses which utilize the monitor, and gives you a "window" of view. Problem with this tech is the sunglass-effect of the lcd-shuttering, as well as phosphorous remnants causing a "ghosting" effect.

 

The other kind is the HMD (Head-Mounted Display). These often have a motion tracker as well. These VR-headsets became a new phenomenon in the middle 90s, and ultimately flopped because the technology wasn't mature enough. They were too heavy, extremely low resolution, extremely low Field of View, and caused headaches due to low refresh-rates.

 

Recently a new breed of these devices were designed. As of this writing, there is really only 1 which is remotely viable, and that is the Z800 3DVisor.

But I'd personally advise against it.

 

The improvements to the Z800 over others, is the very light design using flicker-free OLED screens. There's also a relatively higher FOV, and there's a noise-cancelling microphone. Also important is that it has a motion-tracker.

 

The negative parts:

 

-Despite the FOV being higher than in any other similar product, the FOV is still too low. It doesn't feel like being enveloped by a world. It feels more like viewing a 105 inch monitor from 12 feet away.

 

-Low refresh-rates of 30Hz per eye (60Hz total) causes headache unless you use it less than 1 hour at a time.

 

-Resolution is only 800x600. You can only imagine how visible aliasing will be when you see it up-close. Higher res is more important the closer you view it.

 

 

It's a very promising first step to rekindle the once-flopped VR-hype of the mid 90s, but I'll wait for the ultimate device. We must hope Emagin works on the next generation.

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Guest 609_SHTOPOR

They need to create something like 1920X1200 OLED screens for each eye

running at 85Hz for lets say 2000$, then we can definitely talk about HUGE

business case or even make it 2560X1600 which would be like watching your 40 inch from less then a 1 meter away. If you sit in real cocpit and place 40 inch frame between all gauges and yourself it would be exactly what u would see through those glasses, which is true-like vision of cockpit.

All they need is just 2 tiny dispays being able to give such resolutions at high frequency. OLED displays have even better then CRT image, so u can imagine how cool it will be. I say 5+ years and we are there, right when BOB of Maddox and next thing from ED arrives.

Im I too optimistic? You bet.

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Even then, it won't be like reality. You see, in reality you also have "depth-perception" with just 1 eye! The depth of field effect.

 

Of course, to calculate the DOF in-game in realtime will be impossible without some sensors checking where the iris is looking at any given time. Much like the Fraunhofer prototype autostereoscopic monitor.

 

A better way would be to simply make EACH OLED-screen autostereoscopic.

Hi resolution would obviously be a bonus as well..

 

I think this sort of tech I just outlined is far away though.. maybe 10 years away if markets permit.

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But if no-one uses the devices, why did E.D. feel pressured to re-instate the display setting to allow them? (they specificaly said that's why they'd restored that resolution) - or was it for all those legacy VGA users too shy to speak up ? Or are there a whole lot of Russian 3D users out there who aren't replying?

Cheers.

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I haven't flown Lock On with Stereoscopic glasses, but I've done so in IL2. The general impression is that it's hilariously fun, but there is a few rather distinct drawbacks with stereoscopic glasses in games.

 

For once, you will need to adjust your eyes to a new focus-point because of the 3D Depth-perception. Normally your focus when watching the screen will be directly, or just beyond, the glass plate of the screen. This focus-point will introduce something of a double-vision when you are using 3D glasses, as your focuspoint is much closer to the back of the screen case, or even the wall behind it, than to the glass plate. Takes time and practice to get used to, and you will most likely suffer from a blinding headache while learning how to correct your focal-point. Aimpoints etc will suffer for this when accuracy is needed, like in AA Gunnery (especially in IL2, no idea on how it will be in Lock On).

 

There's also a set of criteria for your monitor with some, if not most, stereoscopic glasses. Your monitor and vidcard must be able to run at 100hz or above for the glasses to work properly. This might have changed with newer glasses, but older ones will very often have this as a needed thing. There is also a limit in resolution for many glasses, which sucks. Not fun having to step down to 800x600 just to get the effect when you're used to running in 1024x768 or higher.

 

Lastly: ATI offers NO native driver-support for stereoscopic 3d vision with their graphics-cards as far as I know. I do believe that eDimentional has come up with a set of glasses that will let you enjoy SS3D vision on any card, but I'm not sure about this. nVidia does have stereoscopic drivers, but last time I tried them, they were quirky and rather hard to get to function properly.

 

When SS3D works, though, and you've gotten used to the new focuspoints and such, it's insanely fun. Since you now have a better perception of depth, altitude and to some extent speed will become more notable. Doing a vertical dive from 12000 feet in an ME109 tought me a few things about Vertigo when I had the glasses on, so to speak. So much that I forgot to pull up, and made me make another badger-den in a russian hillside. Speed at low altitudes also become more noticeable. Thundering along at high speed in a valley suddenly became an adrenaline-filled thing.

Regards

Fjordmonkey

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These insufficiencies you speak of are all part and parcel of shutterglasses.

However, it takes something like 1 to 2 weeks to get your eyes adjusted.

 

It's different with HMDs such as z800 3dvisor, because you may adjust the display for each eye. But as I said, even with HMDs using current technology standards, the Depth of Field effect will still be glowing with its absence. The only way to remedy that would be:

 

1)Each display being autostereoscopic, thus allowing the field effect to form naturally.

 

or

 

2)Each display accompanied by an iris-tracking sensor that follows the eye movement. Eye movement is then linked to the software driver. The DOF feature will only be compatible with games and simulators which support it..

These will then need the GPU to render the DOF-effect either as a post-process per frame or as a part of the rendering pipeline in realtime.

We're talking about technology quite a way off.

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Dronas: That dual colour thing might be a relatively pain free way to do it, & wouldn't need the resolution dropped (except for FPS reasons).

About 10 years ago i bought an attachment for my SLR that had some mirrors inside & worked as an image splitter. It came with a prismatic viewer and made some quite good 3D slides.

I tried fixing the splitter on the front of this old VHS video I had & made a few videos, then I knocked up a prism out of perspex & made a viewer.

It worked after a fashion. VHS + standard video player + small TV = crap image, & the format changed to high & thin, rather than wide & short, but it did make 3D video that you could watch on the TV.

Cheers.

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  • 1 year later...
First of all, you get to experience true 3d. Not the fake 3d on a monitor, but stereoscopy. Depth perception.

 

Now there are two kinds of 3dglasses. There's the shutterglasses which utilize the monitor, and gives you a "window" of view. Problem with this tech is the sunglass-effect of the lcd-shuttering, as well as phosphorous remnants causing a "ghosting" effect.

 

The other kind is the HMD (Head-Mounted Display). These often have a motion tracker as well. These VR-headsets became a new phenomenon in the middle 90s, and ultimately flopped because the technology wasn't mature enough. They were too heavy, extremely low resolution, extremely low Field of View, and caused headaches due to low refresh-rates.

 

Recently a new breed of these devices were designed. As of this writing, there is really only 1 which is remotely viable, and that is the Z800 3DVisor.

But I'd personally advise against it.

 

The improvements to the Z800 over others, is the very light design using flicker-free OLED screens. There's also a relatively higher FOV, and there's a noise-cancelling microphone. Also important is that it has a motion-tracker.

 

The negative parts:

 

-Despite the FOV being higher than in any other similar product, the FOV is still too low. It doesn't feel like being enveloped by a world. It feels more like viewing a 105 inch monitor from 12 feet away.

 

-Low refresh-rates of 30Hz per eye (60Hz total) causes headache unless you use it less than 1 hour at a time.

 

-Resolution is only 800x600. You can only imagine how visible aliasing will be when you see it up-close. Higher res is more important the closer you view it.

 

 

It's a very promising first step to rekindle the once-flopped VR-hype of the mid 90s, but I'll wait for the ultimate device. We must hope Emagin works on the next generation.

Just posting a link relating to the topic http://www.3dforgames.com/english/products.htm

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I have used the edimensional glasses with much success in lockon FC. The 3D cockpit looks stunning. And all this with the full immersion factor of HOTAS Cougar, TIR, Edimensional glasses, Ivibe seat. Wow! It is like being there.

 

Since purchasing my 8800gts I have not been able to enjoy lockon in 3D as the 8800 drivers do not yet have support for the glasses. If you have a 7900 series or prior card you can check it out for your self. Very cool.

 

Nice effect at high refresh rates on a good quality large CRT. I was running mine at 1024x768 at 150Hz. (Viewsonic P225) A little ghosting but the effect is very very good.

 

Out

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I'm going to watch this as it develops.. Its very interesting indeed...

 

As far as drivers for the 8800 gts not working with your present glasses PoleCat.. I have the same card and installed the newest drivers last night.. They work well with this card and seem to have fixed some issues...

 

These might have fixed your glasses.. Have you tried this yet???

 

~S~

 

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