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Panels, consoles creadet by 3D printers?


JaBoG32_Prinzartus
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Well, certainly they look intresting and I think could be very useful to cockpit builders, only issue I can see at the mo, is the size of item that can be currently printed at home. I understand that it is still a fairly small printing area. I've got a few ww1 aircraft that I had printed by a firm online for my wings of war game I play. The quality really does differ with every order some are good, some are bloody awful.

 

Strangely I've never thought of seeing of they could print out panels for me. Mmmmmm I wonder.

 

Anyway I think it's a technology worth watching closely, if the home printers get a bigger print area and it allows you to print fully moving parts, then it's just a matter of time before we will be able to print out fully working instruments just as easy as printing off an checklist now.

 

Maybe in a couple of years time this will be a reality, certainly I know myself and my best mate have discussed this scenario at length and have agreed that if the tech turns up and at a affordable price I.E. £1000 or less, to go halfs on a printer.

 

For now though, I'm just watching the tech with intreast.

 

Cowboy10uk

 

 

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

 

Fighter pilots make movies, Attack pilots make history, Helicopter pilots make heros.

 

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They might be perfect for printing buttons and knobs, provided the material is solid enough?

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I've been interested in 3D printing for a long time. The up-front investment is steep, but if you're a tinkerer like me, it'd be useful immediately. I wouldn't think panels would be an effective use for the technology, but certainly knobs, oddly-shaped small parts, and ornamental pieces would be fun to whip out on demand.

 

I see the latest offering from MakerBot is just over $2000, so it'll be within reach very soon. Ah, wish lists are fun.

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Subtractive machining is more cost effective than additive machining. Laser cut or 3-axis CNC cut panels are the way to go. Look at it purely from the cost per 1 inch^3 to manufacture and laser cut/cnc always will come out on top as more cost effective and better suited. As a machinist always use the right tools for the job. Additive machining is not the right tool.


Edited by BHawthorne
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3D printing will undoubtably be helpful, but not for making full panels. I can think of a few uses though.

 

1) printing a knob you don't have access to, usually to cast for a mold.

2) brackets to hold panel components (PCBs, LCD displays, etc)

3) custom gears and ratchet assemblies for unique moving parts (a-10 refuel lever, gearing for a custom joystick gimbal, etc)

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can they print with transparent materials yet?

 

Not that I'm aware of. If you need that do mold of your 3d printed object and then pour one with a clear resin would be what you need to do.

 

Even with knobs I'm more apt to subtractive CNC a mold to pour resin into. I'm used to that kind of thing with composite knowledge though.

 

I believe that. For me I'd be more inclined to print than learning to use all the appropriate milling tools. There is a lot more finishing work to make a 3D print be final quality though, but it's work I'm capable of doing.

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