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Reporting Kilo?


Yoda967
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This question is for G B or any of the other guys with carrier flying experience.

 

CV NATOPS states that departing aircraft must make a "Kilo" report (aircraft mission capable).

 

What's the format for a Kilo report and when do you make it?

 

Thanks.

Very Respectfully,

Kurt "Yoda" Kalbfleisch

London

"In my private manual I firmly believed the only time there was too much fuel aboard any aircraft was if it was fire." --Ernest K. Gann

 

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This question is for G B or any of the other guys with carrier flying experience. CV NATOPS states that departing aircraft must make a "Kilo" report (aircraft mission capable). What's the format for a Kilo report and when do you make it?

 

Thanks.

 

 

CNATRA P-816 Page 211 says:

 

The following voice reports and examples are commonly used during Case III departures:

i.Airborne-“Departure, 405, airborne”

ii.Passing 2,500 feet -“Departure, 405, passing 2.5”

iii.Arcing (turning onto the 10NMarc)-“Departure, 405, Arcing”

iv.Established outbound (on assigned radial) -“Departure, 405, Established outbound”

v.Popeye, with altitude-“Departure, 405, Popeye, Angels eighteen”

vi.On top, with altitude -“Departure, 405, On top, Angels twelve”

vii.Kilo (indicates the aircraft is mission-ready) -“Departure, 405,Kilo”

 

Hope this helps

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Thanks, Razor. I'd already found that. So, I guess it's just the preamble and the proword. Thanks!

Very Respectfully,

Kurt "Yoda" Kalbfleisch

London

"In my private manual I firmly believed the only time there was too much fuel aboard any aircraft was if it was fire." --Ernest K. Gann

 

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Thanks, Razor. I'd already found that. So, I guess it's just the preamble and the proword. Thanks!

 

Kilo means ready to proceed on mission. Usually “(side number), passing angels 2.5, kilo.” However, if not ready then you say “(side number), passing angels 2.5” and then at a later time you report “(side number), kilo.”

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Thanks, G B. I'd seen the definition of "Kilo" as a "pilot-coded report" and figured there was something more to it.

 

This leads to another question...if you've already joined up with your wingman at the point, does lead report Kilo for the flight?

Very Respectfully,

Kurt "Yoda" Kalbfleisch

London

"In my private manual I firmly believed the only time there was too much fuel aboard any aircraft was if it was fire." --Ernest K. Gann

 

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Thanks, G B. I'd seen the definition of "Kilo" as a "pilot-coded report" and figured there was something more to it.

 

This leads to another question...if you've already joined up with your wingman at the point, does lead report Kilo for the flight?

 

Kilo is a Case 3 term. There’s no way to be joined up with your wingman by angels 2.5. The kilo report is part of the departure, before any joinup or anything else.

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