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ILS issue. Bug?


JesseJames38
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I am not sure if this is a Bug or not. It has been a while since I have used the ILS system in the A10. maybe about 6 months to a year ago. Previous I was able to use the ILS system and get a localizer bar being accurate at around 10 miles or so. with the glide slope. I figured since I haven't practiced using it much as of late I would fire it up and give it a dry run. So today while landing at Batumi. Setting up the ILS few and having everything set. the localizer was drifting about half way to the right if I was on the right side of the airfield and if I moved to the left side of the airfield it would drift half way to the left. and the glide slope would still have the red flag. some where around 5 miles I think the glide slope indicator flag disappeared but no bar yet. not worried but still the localizer seemed to be messed up even when lined up to the runway. by the time I hit the 2 mile mark the localizer snaps to the center and comes to life. and then I finally find the right elevation for the glide slope. So my question is this. should I be able to get a accurate reading farther out then 2 miles for the localizer. or is this some new bug that may have cropped up and no one really noticed. Not sure about others, But on a foggy night trying to land I like to have a little more then 2 miles to line up for touch down

 

Thanks

Jesse happy flying.

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I've been shooting approaches quite a bit in DCS in the recent months and in many cases I can have a positively ID'ed, localizer signal with the HSI and ADI indicating a good track down the centerline of the localizer beyond 20 DME...I will check Batumi again when I get off of work. Which approach were you shooting the ILS runway 13 or the LOC BC 31? IRL ICAO localizer service volumes project out at several different angles, at +-35 Degrees of the centerline of the Localizer you should be able to pick up a reliable signal out to 10 NM, if you are +-10 degrees of centerline you should be able to pick up a reliable signal out to at least 18 NM assuming no obstructions to the signal itself exists. As far as the glideslope is concerned the standard glideslope is certified out to 10 NM from the transmitter, however in some cases it can be certified out farther than that. Also consider typically a glideslope is set at 3 degrees above the horizon, providing you with some range and altitude queues based on several marker beacons, the inner, middle, and outer marker. If you are at the outer marker and assuming a 3 degree glideslope is present your altitude for glide slope intercept should be roughly 1,400 feet above transmitter elevation. At the middle marker your altitude should be roughly 200 feet above the transmitter elevation. Hope this helps. All information came from chapter 1-1-19 of the 2015 Airman's Information Manual.

http://www.faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/atpubs/aim/aim0101.html see figures 1-1-6 and 1-1-7


Edited by Destroyer37

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I've landed a fair share of ILS landings at Batumi and find that I don't receive Glideslope until about 6mi out. I don't think I have ever gotten it past that.

 

The range at which you intercept the glideslope will vary with Altitude, what is your final approach altitude AGL? (Just to clarify for the question I am asking, assume final approach on an ILS is glideslope intercept.)

Specs:

Fractal Design Define R5 Black, ASUS ROG Strix Z370-E, Intel Core i5-8600K Coffee Lake @ 5.1 GHz, MSI GeForce GTX 1080ti 11GB 352-Bit GDDR5X, Corsair H110i, G.Skill TridentZ 32GB (2x16GB), Samsung 960 Evo M.2 500GB SSD

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