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Auto Arm Airbrakes?


thinkr
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Does the A10C have a function to Auto Arm Airbrakes when you land.

 

Eg. You just touchdown on the runway during a landing and the air brakes deploy automatically.

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If you want to have airbrakes on landing try deploying them on approach and use the throttle to regulate speed.

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Air brakes can't be fully deployed unless there's weight on wheels?

Mine look full when under about 150kts.

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Either way, if you don't want to worry about them after landing deploy them before and use throttle to keep speed up.

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Speedbrakes are limited to 80% extension unless there is weight on wheels. It is not a function of speed.

 

Approaches should be flown with the Speedbrakes at 40%. Upon touchdown, manually extend the speedbrakes fully.

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It should also be noted that speedbrakes (military aircraft) and spoilers (civilian aircraft) do not work in the same way, which is why an autoarming system simply doesn´t make much sense in a military environment, while it makes very much sense in the civilian world.

 

When you use the A-10´s speedbrakes, they create drag by forcing themselves into the slipstream. That´s all they do, and they are quite good at it. You will note that the airbrakes on fighters are usually located at the wingtips (A-6, A-10), somewhere along the rear of the fuselage (F-16, MiG-23, Tornado, F-14, F-18) or on top of the fuselage (F-15, SU-27, Typhoon), while in the civilian world they are always (yeah, I know of the BAe-146, Fokker70/100 and co, but let´s keep it simple here) on top of the wing, spanning at least half of the wingspan in most cases.

 

They are there because their purpose is not to create drag (they are far too small for that. Just look at an airliner from head on with its spoilers extended. It makes barely a difference in its crosssection and therefore doesn´t really create much drag), but to dump the lift created by the wing by disrupting the airflow over it. Hence their official name "spoiler" instead of airbrake.

 

When used in flight, only some panels of the spoiler system open up. They destroy enough lift to force the entire airplane to fly at a higher AOA in order to maintain the needed lift, and a higher AOA at the same powersetting (in this case idle) means less speed.

 

When used on the ground, their job is to make sure the wing loses pretty much most of its lift immediately. If the spoilers are armed, all panels of the system are extended all the way once weight on wheels is registered. This causes the wing to stop working, putting all available weight onto the landing gear, pressing it firmly onto the ground so it can use its tremendous braking power.

 

If you watch videos of landing airliners on YouTube and pay close attention, you can often nicely see how the wings droop once the spoilers are deployed. Thats happens because they don´t produce lift anymore once the spoilers are out, so their own weight forces them down.

 

So yeah, that´s why it makes a lot of sense to put an autoarm system for the spoilers into airliners, while doing the same for airbrakes of fighters wouldn´t really have any benefit at all.

 

EDIT: Yes, of course spoilers also create drag, but what I´m saying is that the little drag they do create is negligible in the grand scheme of things. Creating drag just comes with the job, it is not what they are designed to do. They are designed to dump lift.


Edited by Cookie

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Yeah, I don't think the OP was looking for a discussion about the differences between speedbrakes, decelerons, spoilers, roll spoilers, flight spoilers, ground spoilers, multi-function spoilers, Ground Lift Dump, Dynamic Lift Control, Load Alleviataion Function, spoiler intermix, etc...

 

Just use the big switch under your thumb to push 'em out manually after you land. Per the real A-10.

"They've got us surrounded again - those poor bastards!" - Lt. Col. Creighton Abrams

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Yeah, I don't think the OP was looking for a discussion about the differences between speedbrakes, decelerons, spoilers, roll spoilers, flight spoilers, ground spoilers, multi-function spoilers, Ground Lift Dump, Dynamic Lift Control, Load Alleviataion Function, spoiler intermix, etc...

 

Just use the big switch under your thumb to push 'em out manually after you land. Per the real A-10.

 

You forgot plot spoilers :p

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