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Flying with only one engine


pelmo76
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Why Black Shark can not continue to fly with only one engine?

If I during a mission have a engine failure, I have only one chance: Make an emergency landing!!!

I think that in reality is not the case!:helpsmilie::joystick::inv:

Blackbird: "LA Center, requested flight level Angels 80." (80,000 feet)

Center: "If you think you can get there, buddy, go ahead!"

Blackbird: "Roger; Descending to Angels 80."

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and i believe you have to raise the engine idle of your working engine to emergency power, [handles behind your left elbow, on the back wall]

 

also, I'm pretty sure you have to engage a clutch on the engine that is broken, so that engine does not cause friction on the shaft

 

just guessing here

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Speaking from the perspective of US helicopters only, and by memory.

 

You must stay at or above single engine airspeed...this is calculated in the power and performance charts and is dependent on the gross weight of the A/C. Then perform what is called a run on landing at or above this airspeed. You will not be able to hover.

 

I believe most helicopters have the equivelent of a "Sprague" clutch, which disengages the engine drive in the event of an engine failure. Without this an auto rotation would not be possible, because the engine would still be coupled to the drive train.

 

On some of the real ones you can take the engine power control lever (PCL) into lockout or emergency governor (for you old hands), enabling you to demand a little more power out of the remaining engine, dont know if this is modeled in Black Shark.

 

Hope this helps. :thumbup:

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Answers above are almost there but bear this in mind - Civilian spec'd helicopters have 2 engines for safety (if one fails you fly on the other assuming you fly the profile correctly). Military helicopters have 2 engines to carry the required payload and do the job.

 

Basically in a Civil helicopter the maximum loads are determined to allow single engine flight, in military helicopters the max loads are determined based on what can possibly be carried with all engines operating.

 

So, in a military helicopter, if an engine fails and you're loaded with stuff :

 

1) Ditch some weight - there's the jettison function for that (perhaps even fire off your cannon rounds)

 

2) Check your fuel - you probably have full tank which weighs a lot anyway. Can't jettison that but it will matter when you try and land.

 

3) The KA50 has a free turbine - no need for clutches or disengaging it.

 

4) The helicopter has a power curve just like anything else with a minimum drag speed - I don't know if it is in the manual somewhere, but at a guess probably around 75 Knots (around 140KPH). This is your reference speed - at 140KPH you're going to get your best Climb Rate. If you cannot maintain altitude at that speed on single engine, you will descend.

 

How you land depends on weight at landing (fuel, assuming you jettisoned everything). You can attempt to hover if you're light, the temperature is low and the baro altitude is low - but the safest approach is to make a running landing - just like a fixed wing keep some speed on - this reduces the power required compared to landing from a hover and the extra speed will allow you to fly away again if the approach looks bad.

 

r.

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  • ED Team
Speaking from the perspective of US helicopters only, and by memory.

 

You must stay at or above single engine airspeed...this is calculated in the power and performance charts and is dependent on the gross weight of the A/C. Then perform what is called a run on landing at or above this airspeed. You will not be able to hover.

 

I believe most helicopters have the equivelent of a "Sprague" clutch, which disengages the engine drive in the event of an engine failure. Without this an auto rotation would not be possible, because the engine would still be coupled to the drive train.

 

On some of the real ones you can take the engine power control lever (PCL) into lockout or emergency governor (for you old hands), enabling you to demand a little more power out of the remaining engine, dont know if this is modeled in Black Shark.

 

 

It all carefully modelled. And works.

Ніщо так сильно не ранить мозок, як уламки скла від розбитих рожевих окулярів

There is nothing so hurtful for the brain as splinters of broken rose-coloured spectacles.

Ничто так сильно не ранит мозг, как осколки стекла от разбитых розовых очков (С) Me

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I am personally of the opinion that all of the foibles that we are currently experiencing can be attributed to a lack of understanding as opposed to a lack of modeling........Methinks it's gonna take more than a coupla months of Intensive Virtual Airtime to become fully proficient in the Shark!

 

I for one am gonna enjoy every hour of it - Good Times :D

 

 

:pilotfly:

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  • ED Team
Answers above are almost there but bear this in mind - Civilian spec'd helicopters have 2 engines for safety (if one fails you fly on the other assuming you fly the profile correctly). Military helicopters have 2 engines to carry the required payload and do the job.

 

Basically in a Civil helicopter the maximum loads are determined to allow single engine flight, in military helicopters the max loads are determined based on what can possibly be carried with all engines operating.

 

So, in a military helicopter, if an engine fails and you're loaded with stuff :

 

1) Ditch some weight - there's the jettison function for that (perhaps even fire off your cannon rounds)

 

2) Check your fuel - you probably have full tank which weighs a lot anyway. Can't jettison that but it will matter when you try and land.

 

3) The KA50 has a free turbine - no need for clutches or disengaging it.

You are right but there are two clutches between engine gear box and main gear box to disengage dead turbines for no useless power consumtion.

 

4) The helicopter has a power curve just like anything else with a minimum drag speed - I don't know if it is in the manual somewhere, but at a guess probably around 75 Knots (around 140KPH). This is your reference speed - at 140KPH you're going to get your best Climb Rate. If you cannot maintain altitude at that speed on single engine, you will descend.

The intersection of available power line and power curve can be at lower speed and depends on the weight. Maintaining 130-150 kph you can even climb.

 

How you land depends on weight at landing (fuel, assuming you jettisoned everything). You can attempt to hover if you're light, the temperature is low and the baro altitude is low - but the safest approach is to make a running landing - just like a fixed wing keep some speed on - this reduces the power required compared to landing from a hover and the extra speed will allow you to fly away again if the approach looks bad.

 

r.

 

Another way to land for middle weight, temperature and SL altitude is to use the air cushion.

Performing running landing you can keep reducing your speed before touchdown without reducing TO power. There are two variants: you will touch down at low speed or you even will begin to hover.

Ніщо так сильно не ранить мозок, як уламки скла від розбитих рожевих окулярів

There is nothing so hurtful for the brain as splinters of broken rose-coloured spectacles.

Ничто так сильно не ранит мозг, как осколки стекла от разбитых розовых очков (С) Me

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I think there will be an opportunity here for one Heck of a strategy guide :music_whistling:

Ask Jesus for Forgiveness before you takeoff :pilotfly:!

PC=Win 10 HP 64 bit, Gigabyte Z390, Intel I5-9600k, 32 gig ram, Nvidia 2060 Super 8gig video. TM HOTAS WARTHOG with Saitek Pedals

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The Ka-50 in BS is able to hover in the ground effect area in OEI conditions at sea level without stores and 200kg fuel and take off accelerating in the IGE zone. When using airplane style take-off you can do it with even higher fuel load with OEI. If you can't do it- you are doing something wrong.

"See, to me that's a stupid instrument. It tells what your angle of attack is. If you don't know you shouldn't be flying." - Chuck Yeager, from the back seat of F-15D at age 89.

=RvE=

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Hello!

2 questions for BS engine system: Can we start an engine in flight? Does extinguiching system operate in case of fire?

 

 

 

Yes is work fine you blow all your bottles and fire should go out. Many times been on fire though and had to shut off engine to get fire to go out....

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When I was in the Corps, I flew on Helicopters waaaaaay too much. The only helicopter I really trusted was the Ch-53E because of it's backup engine. I had a friend who personally experienced an engine out in Okinawa a couple years back and they properly brought the bird in using the aux engine. Their hydraulic leaks were a nuisance though. I remember one time flying from Pendleton to Yuma we had some major leaks, and the crew chief told us to brace for a crash landing, of course we sat down fine.. ( I think he was just messing with us) I had another friend get completed douched in fluid, ruining all of his gear.... hahahah good laughs all around though..

 

On auto rotation, I am curious if the Russians have a breathing aparatus if they go down over water?

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When I was in the Corps, I flew on Helicopters waaaaaay too much. The only helicopter I really trusted was the Ch-53E because of it's backup engine. I had a friend who personally experienced an engine out in Okinawa a couple years back and they properly brought the bird in using the aux engine. Their hydraulic leaks were a nuisance though. I remember one time flying from Pendleton to Yuma we had some major leaks, and the crew chief told us to brace for a crash landing, of course we sat down fine.. ( I think he was just messing with us) I had another friend get completed douched in fluid, ruining all of his gear.... hahahah good laughs all around though..

 

On auto rotation, I am curious if the Russians have a breathing aparatus if they go down over water?

 

there is a oxygen suppy inside the ka50 cockpit for the pilot when needed flying high alts. maybe this unit could be also used as a quick breathing unit to escape out the ka50 in water.

 

remember in the ka50 the pilot can eject if needed also.


Edited by diveplane
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