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MiG-21Bis tutorial series


xxJohnxx
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Hi,

 

As with the Sabre I am doing a couple of tutorial videos for the MiG-21Bis, starting off with how to use the Air-to-Air missiles:

 

Air-to-Air missiles:

 

 

 

RSBN Navigation:

 

 

 

Radar:

 

 

 

RSBN + SAU Landing:

 

 

 

NDB Navigation:

 

 

 

RWR and Flares:

 

 

 

RSBN Big Box Approach:

 

 

I will update this post with new videos from time to time.

 

If you would like to see a specific tutorial, please leave a message below!

 

Best regards,

 

John


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Check out my YouTube: xxJohnxx

 

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Hi John I subscribed to your YouTube site yesterday glad your making tutorials for this plane. Can you cover radar procedure s please this is all new for me ty:)

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yes please I can do all the weapons in the MiG I just don't understand the PRMG landings, and all the thing about "course intercept." the tutorial in game doesn't really make sense, and I read the manual and I still dont get it :/

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Nice tutorial, thanks! I have one question:

 

After reading the manual and doing the air-to-air training mission, I got the impression that when using IR missiles you're supposed to wait until at least one of the signal lights to the lower-right of the ASP is illuminated. I couldn't get them to light up in the training mission, and I noticed it didn't happen in your video either. Are these lights not implemented, not applicable to the missiles you (and the training mission) used, bugged, or am I just missing something?

 

Here's the relevant part from p.135 of the manual:

Finally, three signal lights (CU40-41-42) which are not placed on the ASP itself but are a part of the aiming interface, indicate if the IR missile seeker head has locked a target. The green light “1” will light up if RS-2US missiles on the left wing have locked the target; while light “2” is for the RS-2US missiles on the right wing. “62” light is for selected R-60 missiles, regardless of pylon position. Therefore, to recognize that the IR missile seeker has locked the target, you need to hear the lock-on sound and see the lock-on light. If any of the two is missing, the missile could have locked the target only temporarily or locked on to some IR noise.
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Nice tutorial, thanks! I have one question:

 

After reading the manual and doing the air-to-air training mission, I got the impression that when using IR missiles you're supposed to wait until at least one of the signal lights to the lower-right of the ASP is illuminated. I couldn't get them to light up in the training mission, and I noticed it didn't happen in your video either. Are these lights not implemented, not applicable to the missiles you (and the training mission) used, bugged, or am I just missing something?

 

Here's the relevant part from p.135 of the manual:

 

Its a confirmed bug

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......great, looking forward to them.......cheers.....;-)

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YEA!

 

YEA :cheer3nc:

I was just going to ask someone to do this. I can manage the weapons and systems on the Black Shark, but having gone through the Radar tutorial 2 times even using the pause key and reading the script. I have no clue:cry: on how to use it or how to lock a missile on a target.:huh:

I know if someone showed me how to actually do it I would get it but the training is just not working for me. I love flying the airplane anyway

Ask Jesus for Forgiveness before you takeoff :pilotfly:!

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Is there somewhere I can get a diagram of the pylon numbering. I always forget which is what.

 

Yes, in the folder: DCS World\Mods\aircraft\MiG-21BIS\ImagesGUI there is the file called MiG-21.png which shows where which pylon is located on the aircraft.

Check out my YouTube: xxJohnxx

 

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However, looking at it again I noticed that these pylons disagree with the actual weapon selector switch.

 

I added the station numbers according to the wapon selecotr switch here:

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=104843&stc=1&d=1411365259

MiG-21.thumb.png.7d3bf3d0ae3c13133d7ee63b506d713c.png

Check out my YouTube: xxJohnxx

 

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Thank you guys for your feedback! As you requested, a video about using the RSBN and PRMG System of the MiG-21!

 

 

It is quit long, so I added links to certain parts in the information box below the video. There you can also find the mission file for download if you want to try that route yourselfe!

 

 

Enjoy!

 

John

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Check out my YouTube: xxJohnxx

 

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Fantastic Tutorials xxJohnxx. A lot of time and effort has gone into them. Explained well and at a pace that is not too fast. Well done :thumbup:

Don't ask me for advice on these Two Subjects:

 

1.. How to Take Off in the Dora!

2.. How to Land the Dora!

 

UNLESS YOU WANT TO DIE!

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I don't understand flying radials. I've been spoiled by GPS navigation in the ABRIS, I think. What is the point of using the radials? I don't understand. Why not just fly directly to the RSBN signal? and how do the pipers interact? Someone is going to tell me to to refer to the video, but I quite simply don't understand.

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Well, flying on a given radial lets you approach the beacon from the specified heading. Useful when you want to get to an airfield and arrive matching the rwy heading.

 

Today, some squad members and I used it for taking off in crappy weather: we took off at 30 s intervals, then turned and followed a certain radial away from the field. Since we were all on the same radial, we were guaranteed ending up on a line later when we broke the clouds. If you know your current radial and the distance, you can essentially fly in a trail formation even though you can't see eachother, say leader is at radial X 10 km out, 2 is at radial X 8 km out etc.

 

There lots of cool tricks you can do with your approaches too, check the pics on p. 115 and on in the manual.

 

Also, your current radial plus the distance to the beacon form a polar coordinate system in the plane, so you can easily relay your position to others. Think Bullseye.

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Well, flying on a given radial lets you approach the beacon from the specified heading. Useful when you want to get to an airfield and arrive matching the rwy heading.

 

Today, some squad members and I used it for taking off in crappy weather: we took off at 30 s intervals, then turned and followed a certain radial away from the field. Since we were all on the same radial, we were guaranteed ending up on a line later when we broke the clouds. If you know your current radial and the distance, you can essentially fly in a trail formation even though you can't see eachother, say leader is at radial X 10 km out, 2 is at radial X 8 km out etc.

 

There lots of cool tricks you can do with your approaches too, check the pics on p. 115 and on in the manual.

 

Also, your current radial plus the distance to the beacon form a polar coordinate system in the plane, so you can easily relay your position to others. Think Bullseye.

 

That helps. So I twist the desired heading knob to the heading I'd wish to follow the RSBN signal on? And it will merge with the RSBN pointer so long as the system knows I'm flying TO the station? Is this correct?

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Hi guys,

 

Thanks for your feedback!

 

Great job! I was actually on the edge of my seat watching how things panned out while you were "heads down" flying on instruments. There is a lot to be learned here. :)

 

I always love to fly in bad visibility/clouds, using navigation aids and a bit of guesswork and then actually arrive at the point I intend to arrive at. ;)

Having the head down in the instruments kinda simulates that to some extend!

Keep up your good work as well!

 

Always very top quality vids John... and that accent makes it even more enjoyable.

 

I am not sure if everyone agrees on the accent, but thanks anyways! :thumb up: Trying to keep it as understandable as I can.

 

I don't understand flying radials. I've been spoiled by GPS navigation in the ABRIS, I think. What is the point of using the radials? I don't understand. Why not just fly directly to the RSBN signal? and how do the pipers interact? Someone is going to tell me to to refer to the video, but I quite simply don't understand.

 

Additionally to the great explanation Corrigan provided, there are some more uses:

For example, let's say Batumi doesn't have a RSBN station. However, you want to fly there in bad weather. Now, you can go ahead and measure the heading from say Senaki to Batumi on the map. Then, when you fly over Senaki, you set your RSBN needle to that heading, and fly the radial outbound. Even if there is a lot of wind and you have no visibility you will end up exactly over Batumi if you follow that radial.

 

But as Corrigan suggested, the manual gives a lot more stuff to do with radials. You can also read up on "VOR radials" in the internet, which probably will give you some good usage examples as well.

 

Additionally a lot of approaches and departures in civil aviation are flown using RSBN (VOR) radials. While normally they are flown by using GPS, crews normally tune into the RSBN (VOR) frequency as well, just if their GPS or similar systems fail.

 

That helps. So I twist the desired heading knob to the heading I'd wish to follow the RSBN signal on? And it will merge with the RSBN pointer so long as the system knows I'm flying TO the station? Is this correct?

 

You twist the desired heading knob to the heading you want to fly the towards the station/away from it. You can not use the RSBN radials to fly past to either side of the station, you have to fly over it.

 

Best regards,

 

John

Check out my YouTube: xxJohnxx

 

Intel i7 6800k watercooled | ASUS Rampage V Edition 10 | 32 GB RAM | Asus GTX1080 watercooled

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John would you be a dear lad and do a tutorial for PRMG/SAU landing? and make it from 120 km out like textbook if u can. Thanks.

AWAITING ED NEW DAMAGE MODEL IMPLEMENTATION FOR WW2 BIRDS

 

Fat T is above, thin T is below. Long T is faster, Short T is slower. Open triangle is AWACS, closed triangle is your own sensors. Double dash is friendly, Single dash is enemy. Circle is friendly. Strobe is jammer. Strobe to dash is under 35 km. HDD is 7 times range key. Radar to 160 km, IRST to 10 km. Stay low, but never slow.

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