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Some one help me land...


Mt5_Roie
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So about 2/5 landings I'm still crashing and burning on. So I figured I'd grab the video from the bad landings last night and see if you can see what I"m doing wrong. Seems like no matter how well I think I have everythning, she falls out of the sky.

 

So I humbly ask for you assistance in teaching me the error of my ways

 

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When you slow down (at approximately 25 knots) you will come out of ETL (Effective Translational Lift) and loose a lot of lift from the rotors so you need to pull on the collective as you are coming out (you will notice as it starts shaking.) Once out of ETL, keep an eye on the VVI (the gauge under the altimeter) and keep it above -500 feet per minute (or .5 on the gauge.) Then you just need to keep practicing until you start getting the hang of it. Smooth inputs are also very helpful.

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I watched your vid and I noticed that when youre coming out of ETL (see^^^) you have a very little collective. You should pull it more. And dont lift your nose so hard, make your approach more smooth.

 

...and one more notice - try to fly it more like an airplane than a chopper :thumbup:


Edited by Suchacz
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When you slow down (at approximately 25 knots) you will come out of ETL (Effective Translational Lift) and loose a lot of lift from the rotors so you need to pull on the collective as you are coming out (you will notice as it starts shaking.) Once out of ETL, keep an eye on the VVI (the gauge under the altimeter) and keep it above -500 feet per minute (or .5 on the gauge.) Then you just need to keep practicing until you start getting the hang of it. Smooth inputs are also very helpful.

 

I agree, but I always keep VSI to less than -300 fpm. Also, avoid jerking the controls once you begin loosing ETL, and keep pulling the collective up very slowly and continuous, as you're slowing down, until you are at a hover; don't forget to compensate for the collective by pushing the left pedal slowly as you feel the aircraft begin to rotate to the right. By all means. don't just pull up hard on the collective at the last second that makes it worse...you could also join our group and get some hands on training by a real UH-1 pilot. Matter of fact we're doing some training tonight. smile.gif Join here:

 

http://1stcavdiv.conceptbb.com/

 

Hi all...I have joined this organization and have found it to just what the doctor ordered for us UH-1 lovers. It's a likeminded group of individuals who want to experience U.S. Army style flight in the UH-1H. I believe this organization will appeal to the experienced as well as the novice helicopter pilots.

 

The unit will offer helicopter flight training by real world U.S. Army helicopter pilots with over two thousand hours of real world UH-1 flight time and also understand the flight characteristics of the DCS flight model, so that pilots new to the DCS Huey can more easily understand and anticipate some of the nuances that are built in to the DCS model(s). The hope is that by understanding this most basic of the advanced airframes, the UH-1H, you will have a more comprehensive understanding when the more complicated aircraft come on line.

 

As new helicopters (i.e. AH-64 or maybe UH-60 hint, hint) are released by DCS, new training programs will be established. If you are an experienced DCS UH-1 pilot or have real world experience, we would love to invite you to join our organization to experience a common bond with other members who appreciate the UH-1 and helicopter flight in general.

[url=http://1stcavdiv.conceptbb.com/][/url]


Edited by sSkullZnBoneZz



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.

Hi all...after reading and listening to everyone, I would just like to say that it takes a lot of practice to control a Huey. I know it sounds like I toot my own horn when I say that I am a real world Huey driver with over 2000 hours but I only say that so that folks will know that I have some idea as to what a real Huey's flight characteristics are like.

 

This DCS model is very accurate and it flies like the real thing. I learned to fly the UH-1H in the U.S. Army and I can tell you...no one can walk in off the street and fly this aircraft nor will anyone in this forum. It does take a lot of patience and practice to learn this aircraft but I feel that everyone can learn to fly this aircraft with accuracy. Some points that might help are:

 

1.Most fixed wing guys are not use to flying with your pedals. It take a lot of pedal control to keep the aircraft from turning around its rotor system so put a lot of “LEFT” pedal in when hovering. The amount of pedal will probably feel exaggerated to most fixed wing guys and girls but hovering is about the pedals.

2. When coming in for a normal landing, it should look like a brisk walk in your peripheral vision. When you start to decelerate the aircraft watch your airspeed indicator and when you get to around 30 knots, add collective…bring it to about 20 psi, this will help you “catch” the aircraft before it plunges into uncontrollability. You should never go below 30 knots with your collective bottomed out…you will almost never recover from this configuration. I watch a lot of the video’s that are posted and see the torque meter at “0” while screaming in for a landing, in a real aircraft you will almost never “0” your torque (this will cause instability…unless your autorotating). You should try to be at the above mentioned “Brisk walk” at around 100 feet AGL. It will seem very odd to some folks but this is the way a real helicopter is landed…slowly…a helicopter doesn’t have the same approach speed sight picture as a fixed wing and most try to land it like they are flying a fixed wing aircraft. If you’re a fixed wing guy your approach will seem exaggerated in how slow your approaching the ground.

I want all to feel how great the UH-1H is so if I can help you understand the nueances of this great machine then I will always be there to advise. I hope this helped

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  • ED Team

Start your landing approach a lot earlier, shallow angle of approach, and do combat landings to begin with as it is easier. ( land with some forward motion still )

 

Most of all enjoy doing it :)

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I watched it again and noticed you start to drop like a rock at about 10-20 knots. But at the same time you're rotating to the left. Try keeping the aircraft straight. I have attempted several hot LZ landings were I did that trying to slow down fast, land and avoid trees all at the same time but ended up crashing because I was rotating away from an obstacle as I descended. Try just a straight landing. I would go into free flight and try landing in line with the runway on the runway numbers. That's how I learned. Just hours of practicing landing on the numbers...




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Yup IonicRipper gave sound advice.

 

LOL, that was fun though:)

It might be easier if you have a smaller landing approach angle to start, ie not coming in so high.

 

You need to watch your speed/alt/vvi, that was waaay shaky hehe.

 

Try from a long way out, visualize a point on the windscreen just above the console and line it up with your intended LZ.

Gently fly the huey there slowly bleeding speed all the way by gently increasing your AoA and reducing collective. You can effecitvely control your approach speed and alt this way quite comfortably.

 

Keep speed just above 30kts and vvi around 500. you need to manage that speed and be prepared to compensate with increased collective at the 20-25kts range

 

Also sudden hard rudder inputs when you are in this zone will put you in flying brick mode.

 

Easy way to practice is the one quick mission, just take off on one side of the runway, fly low alt low speed round the radar thingy on the left and land in the same spot.

 

edit: take note of wind, always land into it where possible.


Edited by Vlerkies

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roiegat...all of the above information is accurate and will help you in your approaches. I was going to suggest a slower approach speed. I notice in your video that your making your approach as if your landing a fixed wing aircraft. When in your approach configuration it should appear as a brisk walk in your peripheral vision. It will appear exaggerated to you but always remember slower is better. It will help you control your approach. I don't advise you to come to a hover and "feel" for the ground. You will find it easier if you continue your approach to the ground...I've said this in other post but...my instructor always said to me while making an approach...down and forward...down and forward...never come to a hover always move forward. A proper approach flies to the ground...always forward...hope that helps.


Edited by flyer49

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...and one more important thing I posted elsewhere

I have another (imho) useful advice:

 

Pick her up into hover in the ground effect and memorize the actual collective setting. This collective seting is very important, because right now it generates just the right amount of lift, that is needed, when you're out of ETL and you want a safe descent to exact point like FARP, rooftop etc.

 

You'll find that you will descent gently like feather and it will end safely on the pillow of ground effect. But be careful, below this position the VRS is waiting!

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roiegat...all of the above information is accurate and will help you in your approaches. I was going to suggest a slower approach speed. I notice in your video that your making your approach as if your landing a fixed wing aircraft. When in your approach configuration it should appear as a brisk walk in your peripheral vision. It will appear exaggerated to you but always remember slower is better. It will help you control your approach. I don't advise you to come to a hover and "feel" for the ground. You will find it easier if you continue your approach to the ground...I've said this in other post but...my instructor always said to me while making an approach...down and forward...down and forward...never come to a hover always move forward. A proper approach flies to the ground...always forward...hope that helps.

 

 

Ah man...

 

I had a couple of videos uploading, showing him what not to do, and one where it was what to do!!

 

But after reading that, I guess they are all not what to do :)

 

 

Flyer, can you answer a quick question please.

 

I ahev got into the habit of using force trim when landing. When I am lowering the collective slightly, I am pulling back every so slightly as well on the cyclic to maintain level flight or under the 300ft VSI, I continue the same motions until I Have basically landed. The only exception is that I stop using force trim, when I feel I have the cyclic / trim in enough of a pitch up to maintain the landing slope. Obviously small movements on the cyclic to keep it in place.

 

Is this something you would recommend, or would you fly in with no force trim, the cyclic in a neutral position using your feel to land?

 

Thanks

 


Edited by marker

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Very nice Suchacz !

 

After 20 hours I felt I was gaining reasonably consistent control over my landings..... most don't end in a broken bird now.

 

Still have a ways to go to make it look as controlled as yours though but putting in the time definitely does eventually pay off guys.

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Nice landings there Suchacz good for landing at farp or fob decks or oil rigs however that type of landing will end in a ball of flames trying to insert troops you are a sitting duck for all to shoot down.

This is a good way to learn to control the Huey and that's the way I learned I have moved on to fast approaches get in get out as quick as poss get the boots on the ground taking as little fire as poss.

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Quick question, I will post it here before opening another thread:

 

How do I figure out wind/direction speed? Aside from the obvious fly around looking for smokestacks...

 

I understand that its possible to get a heading/windspeed direction by using your comm. system to talk to towers at various airstrips. Does that cover wind in this simulation? (I.E. there is no local wind but the wind is constant in direction and speed on the entire map)

 

This leads me to my second question, can weather change dynamically during a mission or is it scripted in advance? Thank you.

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How ye gettin on roiegat?

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How do I figure out wind/direction speed? Aside from the obvious fly around looking for smokestacks...

you can somewhat "feel" the drift or need to read the briefing / call it up in game.

 

This leads me to my second question, can weather change dynamically during a mission or is it scripted in advance? Thank you.
Yes! In the Mission Editor you can choose between static / normal weather and dynamic weather, which models a weather system over the map.

 

EDIT: Good thread to start with dynamic weather: HERE A warning, though it messes up most of the tracks because it does create the conditions dynamic. Watching a track usually ends crashing quickly... you can't have everything:D


Edited by shagrat

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roiegat...all of the above information is accurate and will help you in your approaches. I was going to suggest a slower approach speed. I notice in your video that your making your approach as if your landing a fixed wing aircraft. When in your approach configuration it should appear as a brisk walk in your peripheral vision. It will appear exaggerated to you but always remember slower is better. It will help you control your approach. I don't advise you to come to a hover and "feel" for the ground. You will find it easier if you continue your approach to the ground...I've said this in other post but...my instructor always said to me while making an approach...down and forward...down and forward...never come to a hover always move forward. A proper approach flies to the ground...always forward...hope that helps.

This seems to be the hint, I was needing. I had extreme problems with my "landings", not kidding, it was like 2 out of 100 that did not end in a crash.

 

I tried to follow all the good advices I found here in several threads, but to no real avail ... then I saw flyer49's advice (marked blue).

 

And what can I say? It helped me! Now I can land perfectly! Hehe, j/k, no, I crash still way too often. BUT! This is seemingly the piece of advice that I was lacking.

 

Before, I was trying to come down and slow down until I was in hover to then let the helo descend the last few feet until I touch the ground. This brought me way to close to the VRS envelope (or rather, mostly directly into it). Now, I try to lose altitude and to slow down, BUT NOT GET INTO HOVER. I try to maintain at least a bit air speed, all the way down, until I am really close to the ground (so that even VRS could not do any harm anymore, like 1-2 feet).

 

Now, my good/bad landings ratio is (estimated) about, well, around 3/10! And now I have finally something worth practicing (practicing crashes wasn't really helpful ... especially not for my motivation).

 

Thanks flyer49! :thumbup:

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Before, I was trying to come down and slow down until I was in hover to then let the helo descend the last few feet until I touch the ground. This brought me way to close to the VRS envelope (or rather, mostly directly into it). Now, I try to lose altitude and to slow down, BUT NOT GET INTO HOVER. I try to maintain at least a bit air speed, all the way down, until I am really close to the ground (so that even VRS could not do any harm anymore, like 1-2 feet).

 

Interesting buddy might be where I am going wrong as doing the same as you said.

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roiegat.. you have to come in faster than 40 mph, and while you do so, you have to put the first tick mark on descent stable. Its all about planning.

 

Just trim the bird with right rudder so the momentary increased collective will not rotate your nose to the right.

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